Value of Land Seminar

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Lee Miller
Lee Miller was born in Denison, TX and grew up in East Texas with his family. He studied music education at Stephen F. Austin State University taking a job in television on his last day of student teaching. Lee also provides business authoritative expertise to the broadcast industry as a consultant. Presently he is CEO of MSG Resources LLC, which specializes in consulting within broadcast best practices, distribution technologies and media strategy mastery. - - - - - Lee Miller is a well-known veteran of the broadcast media industry with particular experience in leading for-profit and non-profit broadcasting organizations. His career began in Lufkin, Texas in the early 80’s where he progressed from studio operations to creative services and network management. Mr. Miller has since received various professional designations and memberships such as Society of Broadcast Engineers accredited frequency coordinator, The Energy Professionals Association Certified Energy Consultant, and National Religious Broadcasters Television Committee & past Chair. Lee also serves as the Executive Director of the Advanced Television Broadcasting Alliance, is a member of the Advanced Television Systems Committee and is proud to be part of Texas Association of Broadcasters Golden Mic Club, highlighting extraordinary careers in broadcasting. Continued engagement with his community is at the core of his business practices serving on the board of the Salvation Army and as keyboardist for the contemporary worship band at Harmony Hill Baptist Church. Lee lives near Lufkin Texas on one of his family’s tree farms located in the Texas Forest Country region north of Houston. He is married to Kenla and has two grown children, Joshua, COO of MSGPR Ltd Co and Morgan, a Critical Care ICU RN.

Landowners have much more involved in their properties’ value than the simple price per acre that their land is valued at as real estate. One’s property value also includes water rights, easements, oil and gas leases, and other concerns about development of underground resources.

“The Value of Land,” a conference on issues affecting landowners, will be held May 8 at the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service office in Angelina County, 2201 S. Medford Drive in Lufkin.

Topics will include oil and gas leasing, water rights, easements, groundwater issues, and a discussion on the whether fracturing is hype or a real health hazard?

This seminar is an attempt address concerns for those who care for the land today as well as those of future generations.

As real estate prices rise, those with any kind of long term interests in their property want to stay on top of developments with the water and minerals that lay beneath their property. The mineral rights obviously aren’t always owned by those own the surface. Likewise any shared ownership of minerals will require a great deal of coordination and cooperation when the exploration and oil/gas production begins.

Ground water concerns are a common question I get. Yes, it is true that private water wells must be declared and marked. Failure to do so might allow other wells to be place near yours and drain yours dry. While this is not a new rule, information on the regulation of private water wells will be covered.

Additionally, any easements held on property you own or that you may hold on others is often a contentious issue.

An easement is defined as a right, privilege or advantage in real property, existing distinct from the ownership of the land. In other words, easements consist of an interest (or estate) in real property that does not constitute full ownership. Most commonly, an easement entails the right of a person (or the public) to use the land of another in a certain manner.

Easements can be private or public. Public easements, as mentioned earlier, are those easements to which the right of enjoyment and use are vested in the public generally or in an entire community. Aside from purchasing, there are three ways public easements may be created. Each method is unique and has different requirements. The three ways public easements may arise without purchasing are: (1) by dedication, (2) by prescription and (3) by condemnation.

With private easements, unless its creation is carefully documented and recorded, its legality is questionable.

Registration for the seminar at the door will be $50 per person or $60 per couple, and also includes lunch. Registration on the day of the event will begin at 8:30 a.m. with the program starting at 9 a.m. and lasting until 3 p.m.

Participants may preregister by contacting the Pineywoods Resource Conservation and Development office at 936-568-0414.

Speakers will include Dr. Judon Fambrough, senior lecturer with Texas A&M Real Estate Center, College Station; Dr. Susan Struver, senior research scientist with the Texas A&M Institute of Renewable Natural Resources, College Station; and Jackie Risner, general manager of the Pineywoods Groundwater Conservation District, Nacogdoches.

Sponsors of the event include the Pineywoods Resource Conservation Development council; Pineywoods Groundwater Conservation District; and the AgriLife Extension offices in Angelina, Cherokee, Houston, Nacogdoches, Polk, San Augustine and Tyler counties

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