FEMA Warns Texans to Prepare Now for Flooding

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Misty Boggs
Misty Boggs is the Creative Director at MSGPR. She lives in Angelina County and is pursuing her bachelor's degree in Public Relations and a minor in Creative Writing at Stephen F. Austin State University. Between studying and working, she enjoys teaching her niece and nephew the fine art of never growing old.

DENTON, Texas – People who live in Texas are urged to get ready now for the possibility of flooding, following days of rain and with more potential rain in the forecast.

The Federal Emergency Management Agency’s (FEMA) Region 6 office continues to monitor the flooding threat across parts of the state and stands ready to support state and local partners as needed and requested in any affected areas.

Know Your Risk Before a Flood:

  • Do your homework. Be aware of the potential flooding risks for the particular area where you live.
  • Familiarize yourself with the terms used to identify a flooding hazard. Some of the more common terms used are:
    • A Flash Flood Watch: Flash flooding is possible.  Be prepared to move to higher ground; monitor NOAA Weather Radio, commercial radio, or television for information.
    • A Flash Flood Warning: A flash flood is occurring; seek higher ground on foot immediately.

Take Action Before and During a Flood:

  • Build an emergency kit and make a family communications plan.
  • Listen to local officials and monitor your local radio or television for information.
  • Do not drive into flooded areas. Turn Around; Don’t Drown. Two feet of rushing water can carry away most vehicles.
  • Do not walk through flowing water.  Six inches of swiftly moving water can knock you off your feet.
  • Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEAs) are now being sent directly to many cell phones on participating wireless carriers’ networks.  WEAs sent by public safety officials such as the National Weather Service are designed to get your attention and to provide brief, critical instructions to warn about imminent threats like severe weather.  Take the alert seriously and follow instructions.  More information is available on WEA at www.fema.gov/wireless-emergency-alerts.

Visit www.ready.gov or www.nws.noaa.gov for more information on preparing for floods or other disasters.

 

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